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In brief – André Vidiz

This edition of ‘in brief, takes us back to Brazil, where we meet André Vidiz from São Paulo.

Tell us your name, age and where you’re from:

André Vidiz, age 31, São Paulo, SP

What’s your background and how did you come to endurance riding?

I was born in São Paulo, and I started riding when I was six, encouraged by my father. He fell in love with endurance riding; and I’ve followed along. I got my undergrad diploma in 2005, majoring in business. In 2010 I took a year off to dedicate myself to riding only. Although living and working in São Paulo, I do ride twice a week. That’s really important to me and makes me extremely happy.
Endurance riding is something that goes around family. And that extends to everyone who rides, I believe. It isn’t just my family; everyone ends up bringing their son, father, wife, nephew or sister along. Today I ride with my uncle, and my sister used to come with us too. My father was the one bringing endurance riding into the family. It is a family tradition indeed.

André VidizWhat are your biggest achievements in endurance?

I would say that earning the third place on the Young Horse Endurance Championship in 2009 riding Mágico Endurance was my most memorable achievement. It was an old project of mine and during the process my relationship with the horse got very profound. I felt a great level of connection and closeness I’ve never felt before. Having earned such a great result in such a personal project felt really unique and special.

What is the thing that most interests you in endurance?

What interests me the most in endurance riding is this connection that only intensifies during the race, do you know what I mean? After crossing the finish line there’s this connection I’ve never felt in other places, one that makes me feel complete and that is full of meaning. There’s this idea of overcoming something that is only possible when you and the horse work together. That’s what is the most striking within this sport: in the end, horse and rider are one. I suppose every equestrian sport revolves around the relationship between horse and rider. It’s clear that the horse quality matters but, nonetheless, the rider who achieves a better communication with the animal has the advantage of understanding the horse and of being understood by it.

Do you ride and train your own horses, or do you ride for someone else?

I ride my uncle’s horses, twice a week. I try to ride the horses that will be used in the upcoming races every week too. When I’m not around, the training is done by professionals, hired for endurance training specifically. I usually design the training schedules with the help of a veterinarian.

Outside of endurance, what do you like to do?

Other than endurance riding, my biggest hobby is soccer. I really enjoy soccer, discussing it, thinking about it! I have a facebook page about it and I attend a lot of games. That’s my biggest hobby I would say!


Image credit: Luis Carlos Ruas

Interview collected with help from: Chevaux


FEI Profile: André Vidiz

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In brief – André Vidiz

This edition of ‘in brief, takes us back to Brazil, where we meet André Vidiz from São Paulo.

Tell us your name, age and where you’re from:

André Vidiz, age 31, São Paulo, SP

What’s your background and how did you come to endurance riding?

I was born in São Paulo, and I started riding when I was six, encouraged by my father. He fell in love with endurance riding; and I’ve followed along. I got my undergrad diploma in 2005, majoring in business. In 2010 I took a year off to dedicate myself to riding only. Although living and working in São Paulo, I do ride twice a week. That’s really important to me and makes me extremely happy.
Endurance riding is something that goes around family. And that extends to everyone who rides, I believe. It isn’t just my family; everyone ends up bringing their son, father, wife, nephew or sister along. Today I ride with my uncle, and my sister used to come with us too. My father was the one bringing endurance riding into the family. It is a family tradition indeed.

André VidizWhat are your biggest achievements in endurance?

I would say that earning the third place on the Young Horse Endurance Championship in 2009 riding Mágico Endurance was my most memorable achievement. It was an old project of mine and during the process my relationship with the horse got very profound. I felt a great level of connection and closeness I’ve never felt before. Having earned such a great result in such a personal project felt really unique and special.

What is the thing that most interests you in endurance?

What interests me the most in endurance riding is this connection that only intensifies during the race, do you know what I mean? After crossing the finish line there’s this connection I’ve never felt in other places, one that makes me feel complete and that is full of meaning. There’s this idea of overcoming something that is only possible when you and the horse work together. That’s what is the most striking within this sport: in the end, horse and rider are one. I suppose every equestrian sport revolves around the relationship between horse and rider. It’s clear that the horse quality matters but, nonetheless, the rider who achieves a better communication with the animal has the advantage of understanding the horse and of being understood by it.

Do you ride and train your own horses, or do you ride for someone else?

I ride my uncle’s horses, twice a week. I try to ride the horses that will be used in the upcoming races every week too. When I’m not around, the training is done by professionals, hired for endurance training specifically. I usually design the training schedules with the help of a veterinarian.

Outside of endurance, what do you like to do?

Other than endurance riding, my biggest hobby is soccer. I really enjoy soccer, discussing it, thinking about it! I have a facebook page about it and I attend a lot of games. That’s my biggest hobby I would say!


Image credit: Luis Carlos Ruas

Interview collected with help from: Chevaux


FEI Profile: André Vidiz

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